Call Us: 1 (571) 318-9522

Archive for the Cultural Awareness Category

Executive Presence: 10 Key Take Away’s in Observing the United Nations’ 7th Annual World Day of Social Justice

Executive Presence:  10 Key Take Away’s in Observing the United Nations’ 7th Annual World Day of Social Justice

by Terri L. Williams

 

Source:  Google Images

Source: Google Images

The United Nations’ (UN) World Day of Social Justice is annually observed on February 20 to encourage people to look at how social justice affects poverty eradication. It also focuses on the goal of achieving full employment and support for social integration.

According to the United Nation’s the World Summit for Social Development was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1995 and resulted in the Copenhagen Declaration and Programme of Action. At this summit, more than 100 political leaders pledged to make the conquest of poverty and full employment, as well as stable, safe and just societies, their overriding objectives. They also agreed on the need to put people at the center of development plans.

Nearly 10 years later, the UN’s member states reviewed the Copenhagen Declaration and Programme of Action when they gathered at a session of the Commission for Social Development in New York in February 2005. They also agreed to commit to advance social development. On November 26, 2007, the UN General Assembly named February 20 as the annual World Day of Social Justice. The day was scheduled to be first observed in 2009. The World Day of Social Justice is a global observance

Source:  Google Images

Source: Google Images

 

 

EXECUTIVE PRESENCE PERSPECTIVES

From an executive presence perspective, fair and equal justice supports good leadership and gravitas.

Source:  Google Images

Source: Google Images

In 2010, author Michael J. Sandel’s, penned Justice What’s the Right Thing to Do, which summarizes how contemporary dilemmas blur social justice, how philosophies about utility, freedom and human rights govern modern American society, and how a “new politics of the common good” could lead to resolving social and political issues.

Publishers Weekly review of the book noted, “Harvard government professor Sandel (Public Philosophy) dazzles in this sweeping survey of hot topics—the recent government bailouts, the draft, surrogate pregnancies, same-sex marriage, immigration reform and reparations for slavery—that situates various sides in the debates in the context of timeless philosophical questions and movements.”

10 Key Take-Aways Include
1. “Welfare, freedom and virtue” are three social principles underscore that justice.
2. A new emphasis on civic duty, solidarity and engagement is a new politics of the common good.
3. A society should practice that which brings satisfaction to the most people, as defined by utilitarianism – a philosophy of moral justice.
4. An example of undermining human value and democracy is outsourcing pregnancy and military service, nonetheless aligns with free market principles.
5. Increasing their prosperity and happiness furthers people’s welfare.
6. Libertarians would pay no taxes, and utilitarians would endorse torture at their extremes.
7. Specific rights that society recognizes results from freedom.
8. Unencumbered by government interference, libertarianism advocates for individuals’ absolute freedom to do with their wealth, property and labor as they wish.
9. Virtue and morality play a role in deciding what’s just, despite a contemporary preference for separating religious ideas from civic discussions.
10. What is fair, moral and just is what a civilization must decide to assure justice.

SOURCES
Michael J. Sandel’s, Justice What’s the Right Thing to Do?
The World Summit for Social Development, which promoted social justice, was held in Copenhagen (pictured above) in 1995.
Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Executive Presence: 5 Lessons from Alex Haley, Veteran and Author

Executive Presence:  5 Lessons from Alex Haley, Veteran and Author

by Terri L. Williams

Alex Haley

Source: Google Images

Twenty-four years ago this week we lost one of the greatest literary writers of our time. Alex Haley (born August 11, 1921, died February 10, 1992), United States Coast Guard, Retired.

Alexander Murray Palmer “Alex” Haley was an American writer known as the author of the 1965 book, The Autobiography of Malcolm X and the 1976 book Roots: The Saga of an American Family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alex

Source: Google Images

In 1998, TIME magazine ranked The Autobiography of Malcolm X as one of the 10 most influential nonfiction books of the 20th century. Malcolm X (1992 film) Budget $33 million and Box office sales $48.2 million.

Malcolm

Source: Google Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roots (1977), led to a cultural sensation in the United States, and is currently considered one of the most important U.S. works of the twentieth century. The novel spent months on The New York Times Best Seller List, including 22 weeks in that list’s top spot.

Time

Alex is the of the Anisfield-Wolf Book, Pulitzer Prize, and the NAACP bestowed upon him its Spingarn Medal for his exhaustive research and literary skill combined in Roots. In 2002, he was posthumously awarded the Korean War Service Medal by the government of South Korea.

Roots

Source: Google Images

EXECUTIVE PRESENCE PERSPECTIVES

Alex Haley’s published works were important cultural lessons for the 20th century, Amazon Bookseller reports, “Roots: The Saga of an American Family,” was one of the most important books and television series ever to appear. Roots, galvanized the nation, and created an extraordinary political, racial, social and cultural dialogue that hadn’t been seen since the publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The book sold over one million copies in the first year, and the miniseries was watched by an astonishing 130 million people.

Here are 5 lessons from Alex Haley’s Roots: The Saga of an American Family.

1. CULTURE. Describes cultural aspects of the black experience in the U.S. and, for all Americans.
2. LEGACY: Helped in facing the legacies of slavery and segregation.
3. ETHICS: Teaches ethical principles and critical viewing.
4. DEMOCRACY: How a nation founded on principles of freedom and equality could, for far too long, thrive and prosper on the blood and toil of African-Americans
5. TRUTH: Roots spoke to larger truths about racial slavery and American history.

Starred Review. It’s hard to believe that it has been 30 years since Alex Haley’s groundbreaking historical novel (based on his own family’s history) was first published and became a worldwide phenomenon. Millions have read the story of the young African boy named Kunte Kinte, who in the late 1700s was kidnapped from his homeland and brought to the United States as a slave. Haley follows Kunte Kinte’s family line over the next seven generations, creating a moving historical novel spanning 200 years.

SOURCES
Amazon Books, Roots:  The Saga of an American Family

Gray, Paul (June 8, 1998). “Required Reading: Nonfiction Books”. Time. .

Starred Review. Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.

 

 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS
Page 1 of 3123