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EXECUTIVE PRESENCE: 9 Collaboration Points for Leaders

EXECUTIVE PRESENCE:  9 Collaboration Points for Leaders

by Terri L. Williams

The founding of the United States was based on a concern with human rights and equality. However, over the years, U.S. society has moved away from that premise. Now, it emphasizes pursuing economic goals, not pursuing goals to benefit humanity.
-Richard Hargrove

founding fathers

 

In January 2016, The Atlantic, published “What Is the Greatest Collaboration of All Time?” In this article they obtained input from a number of sources whom provided their best thoughts on collaborative relationship:

the atlantic

The Founding Fathers, the eloquent, often rancorous group that bequeathed to history the United States
-Jay Winik, author, 1944: FDR and the Year That Changed History
~
Abraham Lincoln’s Cabinet, which helped save our nation.
John Sanlorenzo, Cincinnati, Ohio
~
Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Democrat; Winston Churchill, the keeper of the British empire; and Joseph Stalin, the dictator.
-Jay Winik, author, 1944: FDR and the Year That Changed History and April 1865
~
Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones joining forces to create Thriller.
-Jerrod Carmichael, actor and co-creator, The Carmichael Show
~
Wilbur and Orville Wright, which made fixed-wing-aircraft flight possible.
-Rita McGrath, management professor, Columbia Business School

There’s plenty of research to support the idea that collaborative organizations are better positioned for success. The Webster dictionary defines the word collaboration, as the action of working with someone to produce or create something.

collaboration

The times we are living in ranges from the shrinking world due to globalization and an obvious transformation of how we engage with one another. If we look around we see collaboration everywhere. Corporate organizations merge, through partnerships and acquisitions; entertainers often collaborate to produce art such as music, film, and community efforts. While these actions occur almost daily, collaboration is one of the most difficult actions to master, quite often because of the differences in people.

HBRThe difficulty in collaboration lies in culture. Organizational culture and ethnic cultures are the two primary areas. In 2011, Harvard Business Review’ (HBR), published Are You a Collaborative Leader? Authors Herminia Ibarra and Morton T. Hansen shared, that social media and technologies have put connectivity on steroids and made collaboration more integral to business than ever. But without the right leadership, collaboration can go astray. Employees who try to collaborate on everything may wind up stuck in endless meetings, struggling to reach agreement. On the other side of the coin, executives who came of age during the heyday of “command and control” management can have trouble adjusting their style to fit the new realities. https://hbr.org/2011/06/are-you-a-collaborative-leader.html.

 

 

 

In his book, Mastering the Art of Creative Collaboration, author Robert Hargrove, argues that collaboration is the new paradigm in a world of change and complexity, as well as an effective management strategy. Hargrove provides a hands-on guide to becoming more collaborative and to organizing effective collaborative groups. In this lively, engaging book, Hargrove shows his familiarity with the latest management expertise. He draws on quotes and ideas from such authors as Margaret Wheatley, Peter Senge and Tom Peters. getabstract.com recommends this book to executives and managers who wish to facilitate collaborations.

mastering richard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE PRESENCE PERSPECTIVES
From an executive presence perspective, collaboration falls into the area of communications with an emphasis on relationship building. Today, developing a collaborative advantage is more important than excelling in one’s core competency, Additionally, effective collaboration can transform goals into broader cross functional opportunities.

1. The real creativity and effectiveness that comes through collaboration is often blinded by individualism.
“For people to collaborate, they must see the goal as significant and as something they cannot achieve on their own.”
-Richard Hargrove

2. Achieving extraordinary results, includes a creative collaboration which brings extraordinary combinations of people together
“Whenever anything of significance is being accomplished in the world today, it is being accomplished by people collaborating across professional and cultural frontiers.”
-Richard Hargrove

3. To become a collaborative person, see yourself as a visionary leader, creator, and organizing maestro who can bring a group of extraordinary people together.
“Creating shared understood goals allows smart people with big egos to subordinate their egos while contributing to something significant and lasting.”
-Richard Hargrove

4. Collaboration involves a shared creation or discovery that leads to a breakthrough.
“Collaboration is an idea whose time has come.”
-Richard Hargrove

5. Collaborative people know their own view or talent is limited; they understand that they need collaborators with other views and talents.
“Whatever it is called, the breakthroughs of the twenty-first century will come from an expanding concept of what it is to be human – something we call being a collaborative person, not just the desire for economic and technical growth.”
-Richard Hargrove

6. A new paradigm based on collaborative relationships has replaced the top-down hierarchical model.
“’Collaboration’ implies doing something together, and that is exactly what it is. It is the desire or need to create or discover something new, while thinking and working with others, that distinguishes the action.”
-Richard Hargrove

7. Anything of significance is difficult to accomplish alone.
“Collaboration is the act (or process) of ’shared creation’ or discovery.”
-Richard Hargrove

8. Collaborative people are those who identify a possibility and recognize that their own view, perspective, or talent is not enough to make it a reality. They need other views, perspectives, and talents.”
-Richard Hargrove

8. Begin a creative collaboration with a “declaration of impossibility,” describing the breakthrough result you want.
“The different views and perspectives in a collaboration are essential to help people understand each other better and to light the spark of creativity.”
-Richard Hargrove

9. Professional and cultural boundaries are environments where people are collaborating with excellence.
“In many cases, our individualistic model has blinded us to the real source of creativity and effectiveness. Today, there is a profound shift taking place from the individualistic to the collaborative model due to many factors, such as change and complexity.”
-Richard Hargrove

In summary, collaboration an action taken to be provide greater results will be a survival technique for the majority of our success.  Understanding the need to move form being individualistic to collaborative is a skill set that will need development and focus.

SOURCES
Hargrove, Robert, Mastering the Art of Creative Collaboration

Images, Google.

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EXECUTIVE PRESENCE: 10 Key Points for Justice

EXECUTIVE PRESENCE: 10 Key Points for Justice

by Terri L. Williams

This week we celebrated our 240th celebration of the United States Declaration of Independence. This photo depicts a 1902 Independence Day celebration with children representative of all ethnicities celebrating.

 independence dayAdditionally, this week we ended our week with our Nation’s flags at Half Staff in observance of the three horrific situations which resulted in over 10 murders across our Nation (Louisiana, Minnesota, and Texas). Each of these murders, embark on our freedom, prejudice, racism, and inequality.

 

 

 

 

We cannot be full, evolved human beings until we care about human rights and basic dignity.

-Bryan Stevenson, lawyer

stephensonBryan is the author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, and founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative, He is a public-interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned. His 2012 Ted Talk, “We need to talk about an injustice”, has received over 3 million views, and still holds the largest amount of views of all Ted Talks.-please click here to view: http://www.ted.com/talks/bryan_stevenson_we_need_to_talk_about_an_injustice?language=en

 

 

In his New York Times Bestseller, Justice What’s the Right Thing to Do? Michael Sandel, Harvard government and political philosophy professor argues for “politics of moral engagement” that brings all citizens together in a quest for a just society

 Michael J. Sandel is a professor of government at Harvard University, where he teaches political philosophy.

 

justice-book SandelHe is best known for the Harvard course “Justice” and for his critique of John RawlsA Theory of Justice in his first book, Liberalism and the Limits of Justice (1982). He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

Harvard University

Justice.   What’s the Right Thing To Do?

The Moral Side of Murder (please click here)

https://youtu.be/kBdfcR-8hEY

 

 

EXECUTIVE PRESENCE PERSPECTIVES:

From an Executive Presence perspective, “justice” is a gravitas – leadership issue. How we develop policies and demonstrate justice is a priority in our gravitas components of vision, confidence, decisiveness, emotional intelligence, reputation, and courage.  Michael Sandel’s work will help enhance our knowledge in how contemporary dilemmas blur social justice; how philosophies about utility, freedom and human rights govern modern American society; and how a “new politics of the common good” could lead to resolving social and political issues.

 

10 Important Key Points

  1. Virtue and morality play a role in deciding what’s just, despite a contemporary preference for separating religious ideas from civic discussions.
  2. A civilization must decide what is fair, moral and just to assure justice.

“Justice is not only about the right way to distribute things. It is also about the right way to value things.”

-Michael Sandel

 

  1. “welfare, freedom and virtue.” Are the three social principles that underscore justice.
  2. Increasing prosperity and happiness, furthers peoples welfare.

Devoted though we are to prosperity and freedom, we can’t quite shake off the judgmental strand of justice.”

-Michael Sandel

  1. Undermining human value and democracy, by outsourcing pregnancy and military service aligns with free market principles.
  2. Advocates for individuals’ absolute freedom to do with their wealth, property and labor as they wish, unencumbered by government interference is Libertarianism.

 “Is morality a matter of counting lives and weighing costs and benefits, or are certain moral duties and human rights so fundamental that they rise above such calculations?”

-Michael Sandel

 

  1. Society recognizing specific rights for individuals implies freedom.
  2. A philosophy of moral justice holds that a society should practice that which brings satisfaction to the most people is Utilitarianism.

 “Not only the Taliban, but also abolitionists and Martin Luther King Jr. have drawn their visions of justice from moral and religious ideals.”

-Michael Sandel

 

  1. Utilitarians would endorse torture and libertarians would pay no taxes, at their extremes.
  2. Emphasizing civic duty, solidarity and engagement is a new politics of the common good.

 “The way things are does not determine the way they ought to be.”

-Michael Sandal

 

Seeking to define justice in a just society, Sandel forays into affirmative action, paid militaries, infant surrogacy, free markets and even cannibalism. His reviews of classical and modern philosophies, rightly intended to guide the reader through his exposition, slow down what is otherwise an informative, illuminating and entertaining book.

MLK-Violence

 

Violence as a way of achieving racial justice is both impractical and immoral. I am not unmindful of the fact that violence often brings about momentary results. Nations have frequently won their independence in battle. But in spite of temporary victories, violence never brings permanent peace.

-Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 

Sources

Sandal, Michael Justice What’s the Right Thing To Do?

Images courtesy of Google Images

 

 

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